New champion from the States

Firstly, our thoughts and love and with Liz Cartledge who as I’m sure you have heard was taken ill when she arrived at the hotel for Welsh KC. Thankfully things seem to be progressing well for her at Hereford Hospital. Let’s hope she is soon home. Not an easy thing to say to such a busy and energetic person but please take it easy, Liz. Good that the Pem judging at Builth could take place outdoors. Lol Boulton (Jonloran) gave a seventh CC to Sarah Taylor and Diana King’s Ch Oregonian Snow Tiger (Ch Nireno Luke Skywalker ex Oregonian Snow Queen) with reserve and BV to his grandsire, Mary Davies’ tri Ch/Rus/Ukr Ch Ermyn Snow Knight (Ch/Am Ch Rosewood Set Sail to Salvenik ex Wharrytons Pansy Potter at Ermyn). A good show for Sarah who also won BOB in Cardis. Celebrations after the bitch judging as it was a quick third plus BOB for the American imported tri Coventry Sky Full Of Stars,18 months old on the day and owned by Linda Roberts (Cherastayne) with one of her co-breeders, Beckie Williams. She won her first at Bath under Dave Jones and her second at EuroCorgi from Vicki Sandage. I think all five of Linda’s champions have managed to win at least one of their CCs at one or more of the year’s ‘big’ shows, Crufts, the League and/or Euro. She was bred by Beckie, Steve Leyerly and Bill Shelton of the Coventry team which has had such an impact on the American show scene in recent years. She is their first UK champion though a couple of others connected with them are on CCs. Her sire is Am GCh Martindale Black Bart whom I’ve mentioned regularly recently. He is by Am Ch Rosewood Brigantine ex Am Ch Sandyshire’s Whirlwind. Brigantine is a brother to Set Sail (who spent some time in the UK with Teresa Maddox) by UK bred Am Ch Twinan Another Chance at Salvenik (by Ch/NZ ChSalvenik Super Chance, and a brother of Ch Twinan Custom Made) ex Am Ch Rosewood Breeze’n By. Whirlwind combines Australian, British and US lines and is by Int Ch Anwyl Winds O Change (by Aus Ch Belroyd Knight Flyer). The new champion’s dam is Am Ch Coventry Born This Way who is by another dog of Liisa Coit’s breeding, Am Ch Rosewood Yankee Clipper (sire also of Breeze’n By). He is by NZ bred Am Ch Dwynella Take A Chance (another son of Super Chance and ex NZ Ch Dwynella Xena Of Salvenik who came to Britain) ex Am Ch Perrymist Vanessa of Rosewood, whose dam was UK export Am Ch Perrymist Constalations. Born This Way’s dam is Am Ch Coventry Mademoiselle, by Am Ch Woodbine Flashy Alibi (brother to our imports Aladar and Alyssum) ex the big winner Am GCh Coventry Vanity Fair. The female line goes back to the Coventry foundation bitch Am Ch Cordeen’s Simply Red and eventually to British export Edrey Larklain Lovely, bred by the Hobbs whom a few of us will remember. RBCC was Ena Elwood’s tri Latvian import Amberynlea Dark Desire with Ellhar (Int Ch Mapleleaf Wisus The Knight In Black ex Int Ch Tula Medaus Lietus). BP was Sue Harrison’s bobtail tri Haresfoot Cora, a daughter of the BV ex Haresfoot Zena. All in all a good day for Snow Knight who went on to win the veteran stakes judged by Fiona Coward-Scholes. Clairmar Red Bracken was second in the MPB stakes under Jean Lawless. Balletcor was second in the breeders competition under Beth Sweigart. Registrations for the second quarter of 2018 total 145, compared with 78 for the same period last year. The half-yearly total is 284 (204 last year). Of the 30 litters, eight carried affixes seen in the show ring and a couple more had both parents from ‘show’ affixes. One litter was bred by an Assured Breeder. One was born by elective caesar, two by emergency caesars, a lower proportion than usual. There are two imports, from Poland and Russia, and two exports, to Sweden and Jamaica. Carrying on with the breed Standard comparison, the UK version says: “Neck: Fairly long. “Forequarters: Lower legs short and as straight as possible, forearm moulded round chest. Ample bone, carried right down to feet. Elbows fitting closely to sides, neither loose nor tied. Shoulders well laid, and angulated at 90 degrees to the upper arm.” In the US, the neck is “Fairly long. Of sufficient length to provide over-all balance of the dog. Slightly arched, clean and blending well into the shoulders. A very short neck giving a stuffy appearance and a long, thin or ewe neck are faulty.” I think we would all agree on this and even though the British Standard doesn’t specifically mention it, we all tend to admire a slight arch which gives a look of quality, as does the smooth blend into the shoulders which makes such a difference to the outline. On forequarters, the Americans have this to say: “Short, forearms turned slightly inward, with the distance between wrists less than between the shoulder joints so that the front does not appear absolutely straight. Ample bone carried right down into the feet. Pasterns firm and nearly straight when viewed from the side. Weak pasterns and knuckling over are serious faults. Shoulder blades long and well laid back along the rib cage. Upper arms nearly equal in length to shoulder blades. Elbows parallel to the body, not prominent, and well set back to allow a line perpendicular to the ground to be drawn from tip of the shoulder blade through to elbow.” Persoanlly I prefer the American detail in most respects. It is all too easy for the British wording to be misinterpreted as ‘as short as possible’, or for those who do not understand the breed to feel that absolutely straight legs are desirable, which of course is not the case in a breed with a ‘wrap around’ front, albeit a much less pronounced one than the Cardigan, Basset or Pekingese. Both Standards call for ‘ample’ bone without defining that – that’s something you can learn only through experience and watching dogs who are correct in this area. It certainly doesn’t mean the heavier the better. The Brits want a 90 degree angle; the Americans don’t specify though I think it is implicit from the rest of the wording that there is more angulation than in many other breeds. I’m not quite sure how an elbow (which is a joint, not a bone) can be ‘parallel’ to anything; here I prefer the British words, ‘fitting closely to the sides’. SiMON PARSONS

The Welsh Corgi League